Change AutoCorrect Options in OpenOffice Writer

Although AutoCorrect is a useful feature most of the time, it can produce some strange errors that are more annoying than the errors it is supposed to fix in the first place.

Like most modern word processors, OpenOffice Writer has a built-in AutoCorrect feature that usually works in the user’s favor to reduce or eliminate typos. For the other times, you can learn how to change the AutoCorrect options in OpenOffice Writer to create a more customized experience with the feature.

Why Change AutoCorrect Options?

Publishers of word processors are constantly adding features to their software to make editing text faster and more convenient. Checking your spelling and grammar as you type are passive features that let you choose whether to make the changes suggested by the program. Other features such as AutoCorrect are applied automatically, forcing you to correct whatever errors the feature adds to your document.

One example of an AutoCorrect error occurs when using parentheses. For example, when typing (c) into OpenOffice Writer, AutoCorrect changes it to the copyright symbol or ©. This is OK if that’s what you intended but if you often need a C in parentheses, the feature is more work than it’s worth. Luckily, OpenOffice offers a simple way to change AutoCorrect’s options to make the feature work more like the way you need it to.

Changing OpenOffice Writer’s AutoCorrect Options

To use the example above, we will remove the AutoCorrect feature that automatically changes a C in parentheses into a copyright symbol. Open Writer and click on Format>AutoCorrect>AutoCorrect Options.

OpenOffice Writer AutoCorrect Options

You should now be looking at the AutoCorrect window. Click on the Replace tab and notice that the window displays many different entries. Locate and click on the one labeled (C) and note at the top of the window that (C) is in the Replace box and © is in the With box.

Delete Copyright Symbol AutoCorrect Option

Since we no longer want AutoCorrect to automatically make this change, click the Delete button and the feature will no longer appear in the list of entries. Note that you can do this for any of the entries in the list.

Change AutoCorrect Options in OpenOffice Writer

You can also add entries by placing text in the Replace box and the text you want AutoCorrect to automatically change it to in the With box. Clicking the Replace button adds the entry to the list. If you want to restore the entries to their default settings, click the Reset button and all entries will be restored just as they were when Writer was first installed.

Although the AutoCorrect feature in any word processing program can be a help with typos, there are times when the feature actually adds errors to your document. OpenOffice Writer adds an easy way to change AutoCorrect’s options to stop these errors.

You can even add custom options to AutoCorrect to speed up your creation of a document. One click of the Reset button restores all AutoCorrect options to the way they were before you added or deleted any entries to the list.

More posts from the How-To Category

Install Komodo Edit Code Editor In Linux

01Aero_In_Use.jpg

Disable Aero (Permanently or Temporarily) in Windows 7

Share Windows XP or 7 Printer with Mac

01Google_Chrome_Displaying_PDF.jpg

Use Google Chrome As The Default PDF Viewer In Ubuntu

Popular Posts This Month

5 Utilities for Changing DNS Servers in Windows Reviewed

windows defender

Windows Defender vs. Security Essentials vs Safety Scanner

youtube ie11 freezing

How To Fix Flash Crashes in Internet Explorer 11

bitlocker error

Fix “This device can’t use a Trusted Platform Module” When Enabling BitLocker

Comments [1]

  1. Christopher Leffler says:

    I use the auto-correct facility extensively for speed in writing in various contexts. Each context has its own jargon, and by use of a system akin to texting, many technical words can be reduced to a 3-letter code for that environment.

    If anyone is interested, I will expand the system I use to give them the feeling for the way I think, and how I therefore shorten long and technical words. It is based on the way that we did just that in the Navy when taking down conversations between aircraft and ourselves in the Control Room, and on homonyms, using the sound, not the correct spelling.

    CL

Leave a Reply